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Research Overview

My research investigates the ecology of natural and anthropogenic induced changes on grassland and pastoral insect communities by creating broad national and international research collaborations. Occurrences of environmental perturbations are increasing, driven by various pressures such as climate change and an expanding human population. In the wake of these challenges, my goal is
to ensure that the viability of grassland ecosystems will be conserved by investigating sustainable management practices and the ecosystem processes which are mediated by insect functional diversity. Specifically, I seek to understand how variability in ecosystem processes impact grassland communities
using a combination of quantitative and modeling strategies, field and experimental observations, and analysis of long-term historical datasets. Currently, my research is generously supported by funding from the USDA.

 

PUBLISHED WORK

The Fruits of My Labor

September, 2018

Stanbrook RA (2018) Assessing the nutrient status of elephant dung in the Aberdare National Park, Kenya. Pachyderm 59: 86–90.

December, 2017

Observations On The Tunneling Behavior And Seed Dispersal Efficacy Of Copris Nubilosus Kohlmann, Cano, And Delgado (Coleoptera: Scarabaeinae: Coprini)

September, 2017

Phylogenetic relationships of Epidrepanus within the subtribe Drepanocerina (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae: Oniticellini), with the description of two new species

December 2020

Dung relocation behavior in three sympatric African Heliocopris dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae) 

January, 2021

Habitat type and altitude work in tandem to drive the community structure of dung beetles in Afromontane forest Journal of Insect Conservation

 
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RESEARCH

Dung beetle mediated ecosystem services from cattle pastures to mountain tops.

 
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DUNG BEETLE DECLINE IN CENTRAL FLORIDA RANCHLANDS

Using observational and historic data we are assessing the factors which may be inducing the declines of dung beetles in Central Florida ranchlands. Species rich, and functionally diverse dung beetle communities are essential providers of beneficial ecosystem services and my work focuses on how species decline effects pastoral and grassland ecosystems.

DUNG BEETLE BIODIVERSITY IN AFROMONTANE ECOSYSTEMS

Afromontane ecosystems are some of the most threatened on the globe and little is known of the insects which reside within them. My research investigates the community attributes of Afromontane dung beetles at varying altitudinal scales and habitats.

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RESEARCH FEATURED IN THE MEDIA

June 3, 2019

NEW RESEARCH COLLABORATION ESTABLISHED WITH NEON

November, 2019

 
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REACH OUT

BIO101 University of Central Florida, Libra Drive, Orlando, Florida 32816

 
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